WEBSITE

OKUMURA
YUKI

ENG

奥村 雄樹

1978年 青森県生まれ・マーストリヒトとブリュッセルを拠点に活動
在外研修:2012年度(1年間)・アントワープ(ベルギー)

僕はアーティスツ・ギルド(AG)という「芸術支援の新しい可能性を模索する社会実験」に参加している(最近は幽霊部員だが)。AGと東京都現代美術館(MOT)が2015年2月に同館で芸術と生活に関する連続討議「生活者としてのアーティストたち」を開催したとき僕は主会場の盛況を尻目に別室で仮設の放送局「生計ラジオ」を担当していたが一連の番組においてゲストと共に議論した「生計」の本質的な政治性——私たちは誰もが個々の勤労によって自身の「生」を「計る」と同時に公的な制度によって自身の「生」を「計られる」存在である——は昨今の封鎖あるいは「自粛要請」下の社会においてより多くの人々に切迫した現実問題として顕れたように思う(僕自身にも)。今回の映像に記録されているのはAGとMOTによる2016年3月の再協働企画「キセイノセイキ」展の一室における僕と参加作家ダン・ペルジョヴスキとの対話の全貌だが「表現の自由」や「(自己)検閲」に論点が移っても肝はやはり個と公の関係である。現在この主題がより危急性を増しているのは論を俟たないが動画に目を通したとき私たちの胸に強く余韻を残すのは図らずも彼の口から出た比喩としての「ウイルス」や「抗体」よりもあいちトリエンナーレ2019への昨夏から続く一連の攻撃も東京オリンピック2020の今夏における全面的な抹消も未だ予期されていない「前夜」——そしてその先に来るはずだった「後日」つまり別の世界線における「今日」——からの絶対的な「隔離」の感覚だろう。

JPN

Born 1978 in Aomori, based in Maastricht and Brussels.
Overseas Study Program: 2012 (one year) in Antwerp.

I’ve been part of Artists’ Guild (AG), a form of “social experiment” that “explores new possibilities of art support,” although I’m more like a ghost member these days. On the occasion of “Life, Living and Livelihood of the Artist,” a series of intensive talk sessions at the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo (MOT), organized by AG and MOT jointly in February 2015, I chose to take charge of Life Plan Radio, a makeshift radio station set up in a small conference room, instead of chairing one of the heated debates in the main hall. What I discussed with the two invited guests in our modest programming was the essential politicality of our “life plan”—we “plan” our life through our own individual labor but we also have it “planned” by the government’s tax and social security system—a real and critical problem for more people than ever (including myself) in these times of lockdown or “requested self-restraint.” Documented entirely in my video is a conversation between Dan Perjovschi and myself, amid his own installation for the exhibition “Loose Lips Save Ships,” another collaboration between AG and MOT, in March 2016. Now the topics have shifted to freedom of expression and (self-)censorship, but the discussion’s core remains the relationship between the individual and the system, the actuality of which is even greater today. What strikes us so deeply after watching it, however, is not those now-relevant words like “virus” and “vaccine” coming to the Romanian artist’s lips as metaphors, but the sense of absolute “isolation”—not only from the “eve” prior to incidents like the unrelenting attacks on Aichi Triennale 2019 since last summer and the total erasure of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games this summer, but also from the “day after” that was supposed to come in due course, or in other words, this very “present day” in a timeline that is no longer ours.